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Most popular horse breed
Shetland pony
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Spanish Mustang
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Hock

The hock, or gambrel, is the tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, cat, or dog. It is the anatomical homologue of the ankle of the human foot.

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Random horse wiki

Hock

The hock, or gambrel, is the tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, cat, or dog. It is the anatomical homologue of the ankle of the human foot.

Most popular horse breed

Shetland pony

The Shetland pony is a breed of pony originating in the Shetland Isles. Its the smallest of all pony breeds, and is also the most popular. read more

Top rated horse breed

Spanish Mustang

The true Spanish Mustang is a direct descendant of the horses brought to the New World by the early Spaniards. They are truly America's Original... read more

Dressage horse breeds

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Dressage (pronounced dress-ahhzh /'dr?s??/) (a French term, most commonly translated to mean "training") is a path and destination of competitive horse training, with competitions held at all levels from amateur to the Olympics. Its purpose is to develop a horse's natural athletic ability and willingness to perform, thereby maximizing its potential as a riding horse. Dressage is occasionally referred to as "Horse Ballet" (cf. nl:Dressuur). Although the discipline has ancient roots, dressage was first recognized as an important equestrian pursuit in the West during the Renaissance. Classical dressage is still considered the basis of trained modern dressage.

All riding horses can benefit from use of dressage principles and training techniques. However, horse breeds most often seen at the Olympics and other international FEI competitions are in the warmblood horse breeds category. Dressage is an egalitarian competition in which all breeds are given an opportunity to compete successfully.

The Training Scale

The dressage training scale is arranged in a pyramid fashion, with “rhythm and regularity” at the bottom of the pyramid and “collection” at the top. The training scale is used as a guide for the training of the dressage horse (or any horse, for that matter).Each level is built on as the horse progresses in his training. The levels are also interconnected. For example, a crooked horse is unable to develop impulsion, and a horse that is not relaxed will be less likely to travel with a rhythmic gait.

"Airs" above the ground

The "school jumps," or "airs above the ground" are a series of higher-level dressage maneuvers where the horse leaves the ground. These include the capriole, courbette, the mezair, the croupade, and levade. None are typically seen in modern competitive dressage, but are performed by horses of various riding academies, including the Spanish Riding School in Vienna and the Cadre Noir in Saumur. Horses such as the Andalusian, Lusitano and Lipizzan are the horse breeds most often trained to perform the "airs" today, in part due to their powerfully-conformed hindquarters, which allow them the strength to perform these difficult movements. There were originally seven airs, many of which were used to build into the movements performed today.

Turnout of the horse

It is traditional for horses to have their mane braided. In eventing, the mane is always braided on the right. In competitive dressage, however, it is occasionally braided on the left, should it naturally fall there. Horses are not permitted to have bangles, ribbons, or other decorations in their mane or tail. Hoof polish is usually applied before the horse enters the arena. The horse is impeccably clean, with a bathed coat and sparkling white markings.

Rider clothing

In competition, they wear white breeches, often full-seat leather to help them "stick" in the saddle, with a belt, and a white shirt and stock tie with a small pin. Gloves are usually white. The coat worn is usually solid black with metal buttons. Riders usually wear tall dress boots. Spurs are required at the upper levels, and riders must maintain a steady lower leg for proper use. Whips are not permitted in eventing dressage.


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